Posted in 1950s Fashion, 1960s Fashion, Fashion History, History Of 20th Century Fashion, History Of 20th Century Fashion In Hull, History Of Hull, House Of Mirelle Fashion House Hull Book, Hull Fashion, Hull Retail History, Kingston Upon Hull UK, Photographs, Vintage Fashion Blog, Vintage Fashion History, Vintage Wedding Dresses

Photography: Cataloging The House Of Mirelle Australian Wedding Dress

The Australian Wedding Dress has arrived safely on home soil, travelling just like the bride did between Perth and the UK!

Carrie is photographing and cataloging it and it’s made her think about who the original owner is, what else she wore on the day and the beautiful way it was designed and created.

We’re still looking for the original owner – contact us if you think you know who it might be!

© Carrie Henderson 2017

Posted in History Of Hull, Photographs, Social History

Hull History: Waltham Street Chapel, Central Methodist, Jubilee Church King Edward Street.

Image of The Hull Blitz May 1941 destruction of the City centre. Image courtesy Hull Daily Mail.
Image of The Hull Blitz May 1941 destruction of the City centre. Image courtesy Hull Daily Mail.

The Jubilee Church building on King Edward Street is a stalwart of Hull’s historical centre.

Upstairs in a separate large room. Reminiscent of old chapels it looks out onto the windows of the church.
Upstairs in a separate large room. Reminiscent of old chapels it looks out onto the windows of the church.

Surviving in the cityscape over years of rebuilding, it sits in a single row of Victorian and Edwardian buildings on King Edward Street.

That bit between Waltham, Story St and Albion St miraculously survived the city center bombing of The Hull Blitz, just!

Yesterday I was lucky enough to have a tour of the building.

Having read so much about its history, it was a treat to walk in through the double fronted wooden doors and wander around from top to bottom.

The main church hall from the balcony.
The main church hall from the balcony.

We went through double swing doors into the main church and admired the original wood cladding and the long and light crittle windows – still opened and closed by a hand held winch of old.

The doors have porthole windows with beveled edges on the thick glass.

Although painted white with many layers of emulsion, downstairs a doorway left in the original dark wood conjours up images of the 1930s when people dressed up in hats, coats and gloves to go to church on a Sunday.

That the building is there is nothing short of a miracle. Not even the Hull Royal Infirmary (HRI) on the opposite side of King Edward Street escaped the bombing.

On 7th May 1941 when it was hit, by luck and planning ( wings had already been evacuated ) no-one was killed.

The Waltham Street Chapel, closed for worship in 1936 didn’t escape entirely. It lost the back section in the Blitz but the front remained.

The original wood flooring in the balcony.
The original wood flooring in the balcony.

Afterwards its space was in demand and it leased out the space on the ground and first floor.

When Albion Street was hit, the library moved into the first floor. It remained there until it moved into the Church Institute in 1958.

Many people recall the Nat West Bank occupying the ground floor. They also leased it from the Central Methodist Church.

The slate and black marble fascia of that time was clad with permission from them after the new Methodist church was opened in 1960.

A new sign went up on the front in 1998 and of course nowadays it is The Jubilee Church.

The old wooden stairs. How many thousands of people must have walked them since its opening.
The old wooden stairs. How many thousands of people must have walked them since its opening.Jubilee Church.

They use the rooms in the building for worship, groups or 1-1 meetings. They host crafting and cooking sessions also and the smell of cooking as we walked around was delicious.

At the last minute we were offered the chance to see Nat West’s old safe in the basement.

The door was open and we could look inside to where the money was kept in the old days.

The words “Chubb” were plainly seen over the door frame and the bars and wheel handle that would have opened and closed it every night were too.

jubileechurchhull9carriehendersonI had a go at pushing the door but it was not going anywhere. It remains half open, half closed with the shelves inside stacked with trays and cans.

The basement room is a food bank – which we thought was completely appropriate – and made us smile a lot. 🙂

© Carrie Henderson 2016