Posted in 1930s Fashion, 1940s Fashion, 1950s Fashion, 1960s Fashion, Costume In Museums, Fashion History, Fashion Modelling, Fashion Museums, Films, Haute Couture, History Of 20th Century Couture, History Of 20th Century Fashion, The History Of Haute Couture, Vintage Fashion History

Fashion In Motion Central St Martins Inspired By Christobal Balenciaga V&A London

It’s no secret that the V&A is a world leader in the conservation of textiles and fashion.

As you pass through each of the rooms both are displayed alongside the statues and ceramics, jewelry and artifacts that make it a discovery and joy to visit.

Christobel Balenciaga Evening Coat shown in an American salon, 1954.

This week I was lucky enough to be at the V&A to see a collection by fashion students at Central St Martins inspired by Christobal Balenciaga.

He was a master of haute couture, creating simple and structured designs and unusually for his contemporaries, could do so with his own hands from start to finish.

In his home region of Basque Spain he was apprenticed to a tailor from the age of 12.

It was these skills that ensured he could render fashion illustrations from the page to the finished product with a technique that was uniquely and precisely his.

It gave his work a finesse that allowed him to design highly architectural garments that were nonetheless possible to wear.

Balenciaga Evening Cape Photo By Hiro 1967

Described by Christian Dior as ‘the master of us all,’ he transformed The New Look women’s silhouette so revolutionary in post-war Europe and turned it on its head.

Much of the look of the 1950s can be attributed to Balenciaga: the broad shouldered look of 1951 was his, as was the empire line of the late 50s.

His couture house eventually closed in 1968 but his designs remain influential even today.

It was his work that inspired the 15 designs from Central St Martin’s students shown at the V&A. They attend the London college of art and design with a reputation for pushing the boundaries in fashion.

Push them they did.

Each of the 15 designs were walked through the long galleries to the central catwalk followed by visitors, students, admirers and clouds of photographers with flash bulbs popping.

Taking a respectful circular tour around the permanent fashion exhibit before crossing a packed hallway into the Raphael room the designs remained firm – no frippery here, they retained their structure.

In the collection was a suit designed with a hybrid of 60s and cool glam rock in space age silver, a red trouser suit cut so simply and draped, clinging to the body like a Balenciaga cape and a sculptured men’s outfit using Spanish earthy browns of the Basque countryside.

Cristobal Balenciaga

There was far more layering and texture than you’d ever see in classic Balenciaga but the sculpture was there.

This Fashion In Motion was a more modernist theatre and each design was unique and individual, setting apart one designer from the next.

The V&A has presented Fashion In Motion previously but this collection was timely prior to the exhibition Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion on the 27th May. 

I enjoyed it for the power of the new and pull of the old which in the setting of the V&A was the perfect combination.

© Carrie Henderson 2017

Posted in 1960s Fashion, British History, Fashion History, Oral History, Social History, The History Of Haute Couture

Fashion History: Mini Skirts and Mini Cars – What More Could You Quant From The 60s

“The 1960s were responsible for some of the greatest movements in art, in mime, in music, in dance, in cinema,” Steven Berkoff.

Whether you were into The Beatles or The Stones, wore mini skirt or loons, the baby boomer generation influenced the decades to come in thousands of ways.

How the ’60s  impacted Berkoff’s list can still be seen on the streets and in shops today.

what were you doing in the 60s…

who was your favourite band…..

and what did you wear…

Share a photo if you want to!

Carrie 🙂 

Posted in 1960s Fashion, 1970s Fashion, 1980s Fashion, Creative Non Fiction, Fashion History, History Of 20th Century Couture, House Of Mirelle Fashion House Hull Book, Interviews, Online Magazine Articles, Social History, Vintage Fashion Blog, Vintage Fashion History, Vintage Fashion Journalism, Vintage Fashion Research

Elka Couture: From Poland To Camden, The British Vintage Fashion Label With The Eye Catching Designs

Monica Piekielniak is a fashionista with nous. She knows some of the best finds are tucked away on the rails in charity shops. Little did she guess that her latest discovery – a grey / taupe box jacket – would take her search for the label far away from Poland all the way to the UK:

“I bought a jacket in the thriftshop in Poland with the tag of this company. Everytime when I find any interesting things I’m checking its value, company where it comes from, price in the online shop etc,” she said.

Found In a Polish Thrift Shop. An Elka Couture jacket. Image courtesy Monica Piekielniak.
Found In a Polish Thrift Shop. An Elka Couture jacket. Image courtesy Monica Piekielniak.

“When I saw that in the net ain’t much informations about Elka Couture I became more interested because I realised it isn’t much known company as H&M or New Look etc and when I saw that it was working only in 1960s I was totally shocked.”

“It’s unbelievable that a jacket from 60’s in UK moves to 2015 in Poland!” she added.

Hanging in a Polish thrift shop, waiting for the right person to discover it. Image courtsey Monica Piekielniak.
Hanging in a Polish thrift shop, waiting for the right person to discover it. Image courtsey Monica Piekielniak.

Since she’s found out more about the Elka Couture brand she doesn’t wear the jacket, keeping it as an “interesting item” in her wardrobe.

How the jacket ended up in Poland will always remain a mystery. If any Polish readers know who owned the jacket, post a comment here to let us know!

The box jacket from the back. Image courtsey Monica Piekielniak.
The box jacket from the back. Image courtsey Monica Piekielniak.

Most Elka Couture items are not as well travelled as Monica’s and are found closer to home. Ray Gumbley, photographer, works for the charity Age UK:

“Yesterday I was out looking for a black vintage dress for a model to wear in some photographs I’m doing. I was looking up the name of the label when I came across your site. Its a long black dress with sequins around the  chest inside the label reads ELKA Couture.”

When asked what he was planning on doing with his new couture purchase he said:

“I’m not sure what I’m going to do with the dress yet. I will probably try and auction it or put it in one of our charity shops (I work for Age UK Derby and Derbyshire) to raise some funds for Age UK or do what I normally do and hoard it and keeping swopping it for another dress lol.”

We’d love to know what your decision was, Ray and if you have some photos from portraits you took, go ahead post the link to them here.

Jacqui Taylor is the proud owner of an electric blue textured synthetic dress suit made by Elka Couture. It was designed in a twin-set style that was very fashionable in the 1960s and 1970s.

Elka Couture 1960s or 1970s Suit Jacket. Image Courtesy Jacqui Taylor.
Elka Couture 1960s or 1970s Suit Jacket. Image Courtesy Jacqui Taylor.

“I bought the suit for £55 from an antique/vintage shop in Camden Market  the year before the fire there. I have only ever tried in on, never worn it, just coveted it!”

Thank goodness it survived the fire, Jacqui.

“No, there are no washing instructions on the dress or coat,” she added.

Elka Couture Dress Suit Jacket. Image Courtesy Jacqui Taylor.
Elka Couture Dress Suit Jacket. Image Courtesy Jacqui Taylor.

How can you date this gorgeous outfit?

A law was passed in Britain in 1986 to insert fabric care labels – or laundry symbols – into all garments made in the UK. Between 1963 and 1986 the typical washing machine and temperature symbols that are so familiar to us today were sewn less frequently into garments and were not included at all before the 1960s.

Jaqui’s outfit had no such labelling. That, the synthetic textured fabric and the style helps to date it to the 60s or 70s. What a beautiful eye catching outfit with over 40 years of history behind it.

Monika all the way from Poland, asks the 6 million dollar question – or should that be Euros 😉

“I’m interested if Elka Couture was much known company in UK? Was they selling haute couture clothes …as its name suggests or it was something like the whole network of shops, or the only one in Hull?

“I also found the site of Hull Museum when I saw that they also collect Elka Couture clothes, then why they are so important?”

Well, Monika. I’ll try to give you an answer:

Elka Couture was a label that was based in London in the UK. It produced fashions mainly between the 1960s and the 1970s. Its designs were always eye catching and used 60s or 70s synthetic fabrics that were sometimes bold, sometimes glamorous and always unique.

Your jacket is unusual because it is made of natural fabric – cotton.

The early Elka Couture label on Jacqi Taylor's dress suit jacket.
The early Elka Couture label on Jacqi Taylor’s dress suit jacket.

Elka Couture designs reach across the years since to attract people like you when you find them in the rails of charity shops, in auction  houses or in vintage markets.

A maxi dress with the Elka Couture label was donated to Hull Museum because the label was sold at the House Of Mirelle – and that’s where your search started.

Follow me here as I blog more about Elka Couture, Hull vintage fashion and the House Of Mirelle.

If you have an Elka Couture item take good care of it, it’s a part of British fashion history..

© Carrie Henderson 2015